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Full text of "Panorama (1933)"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/panorama33stat 



PANORAMA 

Class of 1933 

State Teachers College 

North Adams, Massachusetts 




(HmxtmtB 



Pictures of School and Dormitory 

Foreword 

Picture of Mr. Holmes 

Dedication 

Mr. Roy Leon Smith 

In Memoriam 

The Faculty 

Training School Facutly 

In Memoriam . 

Class of 1933 . 

Third Year Class 

Sophomore Class 

Freshmen Class 

Student Council 

Panorama Staff 

Axis Staff 

Team 

Class Play 

Class Day 

Address of Welcome 

Address to Underclassmen 

Response to Seniors 

Ivy Oration 

Ivy Poem 

Class Song 

Class History 1 

Class History 2 

Banquet 

Graduation 

The Student Council 

Glee Club 

Axis 

Dramatic Club 

Women's Athletic Association 

Jokes 

Baby Pictures . 



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WE, THE Class of 1933, the first official, or- 
ganized three year class to graduate from 
the State Teachers College at North Adams, 
Massachusetts, publish our Class Book. 

We shall keep this volume as a treasured 
memento of the days spent in earnest work and 
play at our college among the mountains. 

(UkfiH (Unlnra 

Apple Green and Silver 

^djonl (Uolnrfl 

Golden Yellow 

(Ulaaa ©fftrrra 

President Mariam Austin 

Vice-President Evelyn Gagliardi 

Secretary Marjorie Tirrill 

Treasurer Althea Spring 




MR. ROGER FRANKLIN HOLMES 



firirtratton 



WHETHER it be dances, rings, class book, 
banquet, advertisements, or training school, 
Mr. Holmes has always been ready and willing 
to give efficient advice and help to the Class of 
1933. 

Wishing to express our deep gratitude and 
appreciation for all the assistance he has given 
us as our Class Advisor, we therefore dedicate 
this, our Class Book, to Mr. Roger F. Holmes. 




MR. ROY LEON SMITH 



Jit ifemnnam 



JS011 form §>mttlj 

Born Plymouth, N. Y. September 28, 1879 

Instructor State Normal School 1912-1921 

Principal, then President of State 

Teachers College 1921-1932 

Died North Adams, Mass. June 8, 1932 



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1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



iFarultg 



ALBERT GOULD ELDRIDGE 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Acting President, Head of Department of 
Geography. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Harvard University, S. B. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Teachers College, Columbia University, A. M. 

EXPERIENCE: Before graduating from college, taught rural school at Al- 
stead, N. H. ; tutor, college preparatory subjects, summer camp, Harri- 
son, Me.; laboratory assistant, chemistry, Harvard. After graduation, two 
years, High School, New Bedford, Mass., Elementary Science; two years, 
Principal, Elementary and High School, Canaan, Conn. ; three and half 
years, union superintendent, Massachusetts; North Adams Normal School, 
1916. 

Subjects at North Adams — Primary Reading, Spelling, Grammar, History of 
Education, Gardening, Professional Ethics, Geography, History, Civics, So- 
cial Economics. 

Four summers, social subjects, North Adams; one summer, Geography, Hyan- 

nis; three summers, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. 
Scoutmaster; Sunday School teacher; Sunday School Superintendent. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS OR RECOGNITIONS: 1914, Member 
Committee for preparation Massachusetts State Course, Geography; 
1919, Chairman Committee on Professional Ethics for Normal Schools; 
1927, "Geography Teachers at Philadelphia", article in Journal of Edu- 
cation; 1931, "The Problem of our Wood Pulp and Paper", Journal of 
Geography; 1933, "Maps and Map Standards", report of committee, in 
"The Teaching of Geography", 32nd Yearbook of National Society for 
the Study of Education. Treasurer several years, Massachusetts Normal 
School Teachers Association. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS : National Council of Geography Teachers, 
National Society for the Study of Education, National Geographic Society, 
Massachusetts State Teachers College Association, North Adams Teach- 
ers' Association, Berkshire County Teachers' Association, Berkshire Coun- 
ty Superintendents' Association. 

MARY LOUISE BARIGHT 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Teacher of Literature, Story-Telling, Speech 
Training, Public Speaking, Professional Ethics; Director Dramatics. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Public Schools, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; Bos- 
ton University, '90; Curry's School of Expression, '92. 

11 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 19 33 



GRADUATE STUDY: Curry School of Expression Summer sessions; Colum- 
bia University summer sessions; Chicago University, one year; Boston 
University summer session. 

EXPERIENCE: Rural school, Town of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; private school, 
Nashville, Tenn. ; State Normal School, Westchester, Pa.; University of 
Oregon, Eugene, Ore.; State Normal School, Milwaukee, Wis.; State 
Teachers College, North Adams, Mass. ; Curry School of Expression, sum- 
mer sessions; State Normal School, Castleton, Vt., summer sessions; State 
Normal School, Hyannis, Mass., summer sessions. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS: Outlines, Language courses for use in 
Mark Hopkins School ; Outline of Story-Telling and Speech Training for 
use in State Normal Schools of Mass.; Outlines of courses in Children's 
Literature for use in State Teachers Colleges in Mass. ; Various talks to 
Teachers' conventions, P. T. Assn., Women's clubs. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: North Adams Teachers' Association; 
Berkshire County Teachers' Association; New England Association of 
Teachers of English; National Education Association; National Council 
of Teachers of English ; Mass. State Teachers' College Association. 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL AND STUDY: A general European tour. 

FANNIE ARNOLD BISHOP 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Principal Mark Hopkins Kindergarten; In- 
structor in Kindergarten Methods. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Connecticut State Normal School at Wil- 
limantic; diploma in Kindergarten, 1897; certificate for teaching Grade 
1 after 5 months training period, 1898. Teachers College, Columbia, B. 
S., 1921. 

EXPERIENCE: 3Vi> years, Assistant to Kindergarten training teacher, Wil- 
limantic Model School ; 3 years, Principal, Kindergarten, Norwich, Conn. 
Returned to Willimantic to take place of instructor, who was called to North 
Adams; also Principal Kindergarten, Model School; 18 V~> years in all, 
connection with Alma Mater. 1921, North Adams, Mark Hopkins Kin- 
dergarten. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTION OR RECOGNITIONS: Honor Certificate 
from Willimantic Normal School ; Member State of Connecticut Pension 
Committee ; Member Committee for Progressive Education in Mass. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Officer in Kindergarten organizations, 
Conn, and Mass.; Member Grade Teachers' Association, North Adams; 
Berkshire County Teachers' Association ; State Kindergarten Association ; 
Association for Childhood Education (International Association-Nurs- 
ery School, Kindergarten, Primary Grades represented) ; National Edu- 
cation Association. 

12 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 

THOMAS F. CUMMINGS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Supervisor, Practical Arts, State Teachers 
College. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Grammar and High Schools of North Ad- 
ams; Summer course — Columbia. 

EXPERIENCE: North Adams City Schools and State Teachers College. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Member, Mass. State Teachers College 
Association. 

VIVIAN DIX 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Head of Department of Music. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Boston University, B. S. ; Faelten School, 
Boston, Mass., soloist's diploma New England Conservatory of Music, 
teacher's diploma. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Boston University; Private study with Stuart Mason 
and F. L. Grover, piano and organ. 

EXPERIENCE: Director of Music, The Colby School, New London, N. H., 
1919-22; Supervisor of Public School Music, Chatham, Orleans, Harwich, 
Mass., 1923; State Normal School, Keene, N. H., 1924; Plymouth, Mass., 
1926-27; St. Petersburg, Florida 1925-28; State Teachers College, 
North Adams, 1930. 

PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITIONS: Honor Certificate, New England Con- 
servatory and Boston University. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Supervisor's Association, In 
and About Boston Supervisor's Club, Mass. School Festival Association, 
Mass. State Teachers College Association, National Education Associa- 
tion. 

MINNIE BURKE FIGMIC 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Acting Librarian. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Simmons College, Boston, Mass., B. S. 

EXPERIENCE: Varied experience in college, scientific, industrial, business, 
public libraries. Librarian, Plymouth, Mass. Public Library, six years. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS OR RECOGNITIONS: Contributions to 
"House-Organs", newspapers, library publications on library subjects, li- 
brary problems, book reviews, etc. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Member, American Library Association, 
Detroit Writers' Club, Mass. Library Club, Old Colony Library Club, 
Plymouth Antiquarian Society. 

13 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



ROGER FRANKLIN HOLMES 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Instructor in Educational Psychology, Phil- 
osophy, Method and Management, Penmanship; Director of practice 
teaching; Principal, Mark Hopkins training school. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND : New Britain, Ct. High School, 1916 ; Wes- 
leyan University, B. A., 1920. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Connecticut Summer Normal School, Boston Univer- 
sity. 

EXPERIENCE: Teaching principal, Cummington, Mass., 1921-22; Instructor, 
Latin, Ancient History, English Literature, Wellesley Hills Junior High 
School, 1923; Supervising Principal, West Concord, Mass., 1923-25; Sup- 
ervising principal, Quincy, Mass., 1925-28; North Adams, 1928. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Research committee, Mass. State Teach- 
ers' College Teachers' Association ; Berkshire County Superintendents' As- 
sociation; Mass. Schoolmasters' Club. 

ELIZABETH M. JENKINS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Instructor in Arithmetic methods, Educa- 
tional Psychology, Rural Education. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Easton, Me. High School, 1903; Aroo- 
stook, Me. State Normal School, 1905; Advance course, Aroostook State 
Normal, 1906. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer school, Aroostook State Normal School, Ply- 
mouth, N. H., Normal School; Johnson, Vt., Normal School; Columbia 
University, Chicago University. 

EXPERIENCE: Rural school, Limestone, Maine; Primary grades, Presque 
Isle, Maine; Demonstration teacher and supervisor of primary grades, 
Aroostook State Normal, Presque Isle, Maine ; Principal State Teachers' 
Training Class, Barre, Vt. ; Supervisor, Rural Schools, Dover, Del.; In- 
structor, Rural Education, Delaware University; State Teachers College, 
North Adams. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Member, Rural Education Committee, 
National Education Association. 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL AND STUDY: England, Holland, Belgium, Germany, 
Austria, Italy, France. 

ALICE OWENS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Instructor, Grammar and Composition; 
Language, Reading, Penmanship Methods. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND : Trenton, N. J. High and Normal Schools; 
Quincy, Mass. Training School, Harvard summer session. 

14 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



GRADUATE STUDY: Chautauqua work, five years; Harvard, Lowell, Uni- 
versity Extension Lecture courses. 

EXPERIENCE: All grades, West Hanover, Raynham; Whitman; Supervis- 
ing Principal, Chelsea, Mass. primary and grammar building. Assisted in 
restoring system after great fire. Mark Hopkins training school; organ- 
izor and director, department of seven classes for retards, Binet tests giv- 
en. Teacher of History of Education in addition to present subjects at 
Teachers College ; substitute librarian, summer school. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS OR RECOGNITIONS: Contributions to 
educational papers; demonstration courses; talks to groups of teachers 
and to other organizations. 

MARY ANGELINA PEARSON 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Instructor in Art and Handicraft. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Rsading High School, Abbot Academy, 
Mass. School of Art. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer courses— Round Lake and Saratoga, N. Y. ; 
Glens Falls, N. Y. ; Martha's Vineyard, Mass; Harvard University; Sal- 
em Normal School, State College at Amherst; Rhode Island School of De- 
sign; N. Y. School of Fine and Applied Arts; North Adams Normal. 

EXPERIENCE: Rural school, Reading, two years; grade schools, South- 
bridge, one year. Supervised Drawing, in groups of towns about Boston, 
including Cohasset, North Easton, Easton, Foxboro, Walpole, Rockland, 
Whitman, Bradford, Merrimac, five years. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS OR RECOGNITION: Articles for School 
Arts Magazine, "Nature Drawing From Various Points of View" ; Pro- 
ceedings of Eastern Arts Association; Bulletin, Mass. School of Art; Axis. 
Numerous talks on travel and various art themes to such groups as Wom- 
en's Clubs, Parent-Teachers Association, Teachers' Conventions, Summer 
Schools, and The Business Men's Art League. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Member, American Federation of Arts, 
Eastern Arts Association, International Art Congress, Mass. State Teach- 
ers College Association, Berkshire Teachers Association. 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL AND STUDY: Summer of 1898, visited historic liter- 
ary and art shrines; 1901-1902, year's leave of absence for travel and 
study at the Colorossi Academie — Course Mucha — Paris; 1908, attend- 
ed International Art Congress in London; 1928, attended meetings and 
exhibitions, Prague and in Bruno, Moravia; 1932, visited International 
Art Exhibit at Venice and Prof. Cezek's School in Vienna. 

EXHIBITIONS AND PRIZES : Exhibited, Mass. School of Art ; World's Fairs, 
Toronto and Chicago; Eastern Arts Association, Springfield; State Teach- 
ers College, North Adams; Public Library, North Adams. 

15 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



ELIZABETH AMES WESTON 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Director, Physical Education; Instructor, 
Hygiene, Child Health, Sanitation, and Theory of Physical Education. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Medford High School, Medford, Mass.; 
Sargent School for Physical Education, Cambridge, Mass. ; Harvard Sum- 
mer School for Physical Education; Boston University, School of Educa- 
tion, B. S. in Ed. Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N. J. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer schools— Boston University, Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

EXPERIENCE: Physical Education— New Brunswick, N. J.; Atlantic City, 
N. J.; Brookline, Mass.; 2 years. Rural, Canton, Mass.; 1 Assistant Har- 
vard Summer School, (Corrective Work) ; 2 Hyannis Summer School; 4 
years Playgrounds; 4 summers, Swimming Director, Girls' Camps. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Physical Education Associa- 
tion ; Mass. Physical Education Association ; Berkshire County Physical 
Education Association; State Teachers College Association; Sargent 
School Alumnae Association; Boston University Alumnae Association, Sig- 
ma Kappa Sorority, (National). 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL AND STUDY: 1930— England, France, Germany, 
Switzerland, Belgium, Holland. 

WALLACE H. VENABLE 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Instructor in Science, Economics, Arith- 
metic. Advisor, Student Council. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Bennington, Vt. High School; Univer- 
sity of Vermont, B. S. 

GRADUATE STUDY: 5 summer sessions, Teachers College; Columbia; De- 
gree A. M. in Education, T. C. Columbia; Professional certificate for 
teachers of Science, T. C. Columbia. 

EXPERIENCE: Rural grade school, Shaftsbury, Vt. ; Bennington, Vt. ; 
Principal, 2 years High School, Waitsfield, Vt., also of Junior High School 
and Junior-Senior High School, Waitsfield; Principal Junior-Senior High 
School, Jeffersonville-Cambridge, Vt., Supervising Principal J.-S. H. S., 
Jeffersonville, Cambridge; Instructor, North Adams Summer School; 
Instructor, English, Mass. Extension Course, Greenfield and Pittsfield; 
Instructor, Biology, Extension Course, North Adams; Assistant County 
Agricultural Agent, Lamoille County, Vt. ; Field Artillery, U. S. A. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS OR RECOGNITIONS: Speaker at spe- 
cial groups at teachers' conventions; Collaborator, in construction, 
Mass. Elementary Grade Science Course and in construction of Mass. 
State Teachers College's Science Curriculum. 

16 



193 3 : : : PANORAMA 



PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Mass. State Teachers College Associa 
tion ; North Berkshire Teachers' Association. 

MRS. THERZA VAN ETTEN 

Matron of Taconic Hall. 

MISS BERTHA ALLYN 

MISS THERESA FERGUSON 

Secretaries. 

BERTHA SHOLES BROWN 

Mrs. Josiah Brown, 15 Shaw Street, West Newton. 

State Teachers College 1915-1932; some time between 1917 and 1920 spent 
in Berkshire County Extension Service. 

GRACE L. DONELSON 

Librarian, 1923. Leave of absence, 1931-September, 1933. 

©raining §>rtjonl iFarnlty 

VERA GOLD ANDREWS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Training Teacher at Briggsville Primary. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Greenfield High School, North Adams 
Normal. 

GRADUATE STUDY: S. T. C, Dillon, Montana; B. S. S. of Art, Monterey, 
Mass. ; 3 summers, T. C. Columbia; 2 summers, Boston University. Exten- 
sion Courses — New York University, 5 Mass. University Extension, 2 
Boston University. Whitman Conservatory, Walla Walla, Washington, 
voice. 

EXPERIENCE: First grade, Sunderland, Mass.; First Grade, Amherst, 
Mass. ; Sixth grade and all art through first year high school, Browning, 
Montana, also second handwork, high school; first grade, Walla Walla, 
Washington; first three, Briggsville School, Clarksburg, and teacher 
training. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Berkshire Teachers' Association; Indus- 
trial Arts Co-operative Association ; National Education Association ; 
Mass. State Teachers' College Association. 

EXHIBITIONS: Arts and Crafts, Deerfield, Mass. Raffia baskets, pottery, 
woven rugs, linen runners. Voice recitals. 

ALICE MAY CARD 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: English, Grades 7 and 8, Mark Hopkins. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND : High School, North Adams Normal. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer courses— 3, Columbia University; 1 Univer- 
sity of Vermont; 2 North Adams Teachers College; University Exten- 
sion and Correspondence Courses. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association; Asso- 
ciation of State Teachers' Colleges; North Adams Grade Teachers' As- 
sociation. 

17 



PANORAMA : : : : . . . 1933 



ETHEL M. CARPENTER 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 5. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Drury High School, North Adams Nor- 
mal. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer courses — 2 North Adams Teachers College; 
1 Harvard, 1 Columbia. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association; Mass. 
State Teachers' Colleges Association; N. A. Normal Alumnae; Northern 
Branch of N. A. State Teachers College; Grade Teachers Association. 

VIOLA COOPER 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 4. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Laurel High School, Laurel, Delaware; 
Powhatan College, Charlestown, West Virginia, Teacher training course. 

GRADUATE STUDY: 2 summer sessions, Dover Academy, Dover, Dela- 
ware; 1 summer session and 2 courses during two winter sessions, Dela- 
ware University, Newark, Delaware; 2 sessions, Columbia. 

EXPERIENCE: Mark Hopkins Summer School, Grades 7 and 8, 1 session. 

MARTHA ELIZABETH DURNIN 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Grade 3, Mark Hopkins. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: St. Joseph High School, State Teachers 
College, North Adams. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer School, New York University, North Adams 
Teachers College ; Mass. University Extension, also Winter School. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association; Mass. 
State Teachers College Association ; North Adams Grade Teacher Asso- 
ciation; Berkshire County Teachers Association. 

E. IDELLA HASKINS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 4. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Drury High, North Adams Normal 
(Regular course and 6 months advanced course). 

GRADUATE STUDY: 2 summers, North Adams; Special courses, Dr. Suh- 
rie, N. Y. University; Dr. Armentrout of Colorado, Denver College. 

MARION HOPKINS KETCHUM 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Arithmetic and History, Grades 7 and 8 
Mark Hopkins. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Drury High, North Adams Normal. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summers, North Adams and at Harvard Graduate 
School ; Extension Courses, Williams, Boston University, N. Y. University. 

18 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association; Presi- 
dent, North Adams Grade Teachers Association ; President, North Adams 
Normal Alumnae; Executive Committee, Mass. State Teachers College 
Association. 

LORETTA J. LOFTUS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Grade 3, Mark Hopkins. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Drury High; North Adams Teachers 
College. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer courses, North Adams; University Exten- 
sion. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS OR RECOGNITIONS: "Units of Work 
Based Travel on Abroad", Grade Teacher. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association; Grade 
Teachers Association; Mass. Federation of Teachers; N. A. S. T. C. Alum- 
nae; State Teachers College Association. 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL AND STUDY: Summer in Europe. 

VERONICA AGNES LOFTUS 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 1. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND : Drury High, North Adams State Teach- 
ers College. 

GRADUATE STUDY : Summer courses at North Adams, University Exten- 
sion. 

PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS: Travel articles for Grade Teacher. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association; Grade 
Teachers Association; Mass. Federation of Teachers; N. A. S. T. C. Alum- 
nae ; State Teachers College Association. 

EUROPEAN TRAVEL AND STUDY: Summer in Europe. 

RUTH LYMAN 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES : Briggsville Training School, Grade 7 and 8. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Huntington High School; North Adams 
Teachers College. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer School — Mass. State College; University of 
Maine; Boothbay Art Studios. 

EXPERIENCE: Rural, Peru, Mass.; Grades 1-4, sewing, penmanship; 
Grades 1-8, Lanesboro, Mass. ; Mark Hopkins, Grade 2 ; Briggsville, 
Grades 1-4; Summer School, Mark Hopkins, Grades 5-6. 

19 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 19 33 

HELEN ELIZABETH MALLERY 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 2. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: North Adams Teachers College. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer courses, N. Y. University, North Adams. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Mass. State Teachers College Associa- 
tion; Mass. Teachers Association; National Education Association. 

MARY AGNES NAGLE 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 5. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Drury High, North Adams Normal. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer sessions, 4, North Adams. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: Grade Teachers Association; North 
Adams Alumnae; National Education Association. 

CATHERINE LOUISE TOBIN 

PRESENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Mark Hopkins, Grade 6. 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Westfield High; 4 years, Fitchburg 
State Teachers College, J. H. S. Course. 

GRADUATE STUDY: Summer sessions — 1 Connecticut Summer School, 
Yale; 2, North Adams; 1, Teacher, Demonstration Class, North Adams. 

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS: National Education Association. 

EVELYN MEARS 

Mark Hopkins, September, 1930 to June, 1931. Now teaching, Orange, N. J. 

MARGARET FALLON 

Mrs. Harold P. Henry. Mark Hopkins, February 21, 1925 to June, 1932. 

MARY DURNIN 

Mark Hopkins, March 23, 1931 to June 1932. Entered Convent of Sisters of 
St. Joseph, Holyoke. 



20 



19 3 3 



PANORAMA 



3u iMmnrtam 





Spatrtrr Sfjrrpsa 


Ep iKarrn 




January 17, 1913 


April 20, 


1931 




larbara Hurill? SUtrna 




July 


25, 1913 


February 17, 


1932 



21 



PANORAMA 



1933 



MARIAM AUSTIN 

76 STRATFORD STREET, PITTSFIELD, MASS. 



Best Mixer 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Pageant Chorus 2 
Operetta Chorus 1 
W. A. A. 1, 2 



Best All Around Girl 

Class President 1, 2, 3 
Student Council 1, 2, 3 
Delegate-N. Y. Conf. 1 



A good mixer? Yes. Tactful? Of course. Otherwise, 
how could she ever have steered our clamorous class through 
its weekly meetings and its numerous strenuous activities for 
three whole years? 



EVELYN JEANETTE BARKER 
"Lynn" 

32 THIRD STREET, PITTSFIELD, MASS. 

W. A. A. 1 Axis Staff 3 

Glee Club 2, 3 Pageant 2 

Sec. Taconic Hall 2, 3 Class Book Staff 3 

Student Council 2 Gen. Chair.. Banauet 3 

Evelyn, due to her reliability in obtaining the best or- 
chestra for the Man Dances, has been deeply appreciated 
by the girls. We wonder what future classes will do without 
a capable orchestra chairman like our "Lynn". 



ALICE STEWART BRADFORD 
"Abie" 

23 HOLBROOK STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



Glee Club 2, 3 
Drama Club 2 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Chairman Publicity 2 
Editor-in-Chief Axis 3 
Class Book Staff 3 
Ring Committee 3 



Class Play 

Basketball 1, 

Tenequoit 

Forum 

Student Council 

Pageant 



As Editor-in-Chief of the Axis "Abie" has shown de- 
cided ability in organization. Perhaps this is one of the rea- 
sons why she has been so very successful in her teaching 
assignments. 

THELMA D. CARY 

"Thelm" 

723 CHURCH STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Basketball 1, 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Head of Sports 2 
Forum 3 



Tenequoit 3 

Conference Delegate 1 

Archery 1, 2, 3 

Advt. Mgr., Class Play 3 

Advt. Editor, Axis 1 

Student Council 1 



In basketball "Thelm" has proved unusually skilled and 
we wonder what the team would have done without her. 
Then, too, good scholarship, literary ability, and tact go 
hand in hand with her athletic excellence. 



22 



193 3 



PANORAMA 



KATHERINE ELIZABETH EICHERT 

"Kitty" 

161 RIVER STREET, BLACKINTON, MASS. 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3 Pageant 2 

Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 Axis Staff 2, 3 

President, Dramatic Club 3 Basketball 1, 2 
Orchestra 1, 3 Assistant Chairman, 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 Play Day 2 

Forum 3 

Student Council 2 
Librarian 1, 2 

The name "Kitty" Eichert spells efficiency to every girl 
at S. T. C. N. A. who has had to sell tickets for the Dramatic 
Club. The long list of activities shows evidence of three very 
busy and enthusiastic years spent here at college. 



MARY FRANCES FIELD 

OBLONG ROAD, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3 Treasurer, Glee Club 2 

Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 Forum 3 

Axis Staff 1 W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Vice President, Basketball 2, 3 
Dramatic Club 2 

Mary has dramatic ability, and her dimples, and her ex- 
pressive eyes, which combine to make a winning smile, will 
certainly provide many conquests for her. 



MARY ANNE FLANNERY 
"Mae" 

93 GLEN AVENUE. NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

Glee Club 1 Treasurer, Dramatic Club 2 

Ex. Editor, Axis 1 Washington Pageant 2 
Dramatic Club 2, 3 W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Willing to do her share in school affairs, "Mae" has been 
identified with a number of activities. She takes everything 
in the right spirit and has been an enjoyable companion. 
Success to "Mae" in the future! 

SARAH M. FLEMING 
"Sally" 

STATE ROAD, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. 



Best Sport 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Dramatic Club 1 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Vice Pres. W. A. A. 1 
President, W. A. A. 2, 3 
Conference Delegate, 
W. A. A. 2, 3 



Class Athlete 

Chairman, Play Day 2 

Class Play 3 

Axis Staff 2 

Class Book Staff 3 

Basketball 1, 2, 3 

Carnival Queen 3 



"Class Athlete" mainly through her superior basketball 
guard ability, and undoubtedly "Most Popular" through her 
steady and fair-minded personality, "Sally" is known and 
genuinely liked by everyone in the college, faculty and stu- 
dents alike. 

Things happen when this capable girl is behind them, 
and "come what may" we are convinced "Sally" will make 
her mark in the world. 



23 



PANORAMA 



19 3 3 




EVELYN ELLEN GAGLIARDI 

"Ev" 

11 DUGGAN STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

Drama Club 2, 3 W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Vice-President of Class 2, 3 

Like the proverbial still waters, "Ev's" thoughts seem to 
run deep. She has served well as our Vice-Presfi3ent. With 
her reserved humor, we have a lovely girl and a true friend. 



RUTH IRENE GLEASON 

MAYUNSOOK FARM, CLARKSBURG, MASS. 

Done Most For School 

Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 Guest Day Speaker 3 

Glee Club 2, 3 Axis Staff 1, 3 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 Editor-in-Chief, Axis 2 

Class Day Speaker 1 Editor-in-Chief, 

Student Council 2 Class Book 3 

"Would that I could write a worthy rhyme 
Of a girl who's been so fine." 

Ruth certainly has done some helpful work for her 
school. We are proud to have her in our class. May luck go 
always with her! 




JUANITA H. HAZELTON 

"Nita" 

7 EASTON STREET, WAKEFIELD, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Axis Staff 1, 2 
Librarian, Glee Club 2 
Ensemble 1, 2, 3 2 
Social Committee 



W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Dramatic Club 2 

Operetta 1 

Pageant 2 

Tenequoit 



"Nita as a musician ought to excel 
And in this line we wish her well." 

At many assemblies and public affairs we have been de- 
lighted with her 'cello music. A good sport and a good 
friend, — that's "Nita". 



ELIZABETH AGNES HEWITT 

"Betty" 

152 COLUMBIA STREET, ADAMS, MASS. 

Library 1, 2, 3 W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Book-Week Pageant 1 Senior Play 3 

Washington Pageant 2 Fire Chief 3 

"Thou hast wit, and fun, and fire". 

If we ever need a helping hand in anything, "Betty's" 
one we always find willing, cheerful, and ready to help us. 
When we think of her in the future we'll be reminded im- 
mediately of her obliging, friendly personality, and of her 
quick wit. 



24 



19 3 3 



PANORAMA 



HELEN E. HORAN 

842 SOUTH STATE STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2 
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 



Basketball 1, 2 
Forum 3 



She is ever ready to laugh, and to share the good times 
of all of us. Forge ahead to success, Helen, and with you go 
the best of our wishes. 



DOROTHY JACOBS 
"Dot" 

WASHINGTON AVENUE, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



Basketball 3 
Dramatic Club 1, 3 
Glee Club 1 
Baseball 2 



Pageant 2 

Axis Staff 3 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Play Day 2 



No matter what comment we make, "Dot" invariably can 
go us one better, be it men or mice. However, we always like 
to sharpen our wits against hers, and ever enjoy a brisk, 
though often pointless, agrument with her. 

Although absent for many weeks in her Sophomore year, 
she was able to catch up the threads and proceed with her 
class, to continue with the same success in her profession, 
we hope. 

SOPHIE CONSTANCE JEKANOSKI 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2 
Basketball 1, 2 
Pageant 2 



Chair. 



House Council 2, 3 
Class Book Staff 3 
W. A. A. Banquet 3 



This is the girl, who, someone has reverently stated, pos- 
sesses the most aristocratic face and figure in our class. May 
such a distinction stand you in good stead in later years, 
Sophie, and your smile prove an ever increasing enjoyment 
for your future pupils. 

ANNE ISOBEL LACEY 
"Scorchy" 

CUMMINGTON, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Axis Staff 2, 3 
Student Council 3 
Vice House President 3 
House Council 2 
Pageant 2 



Operetta 2 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 

Class Book Staff 3 

Forum 3 



"Blithe she is, and fair of face, 
Well endowed with airy grace." 

One of Anne's hobbies is reading and one may find her 
thus engaged everywhere, in class meetings especially. She 
loves music and art, too, but she always finds time to make 
many friends. With Anne's vivacious personality we know 
she will be a success wherever she goes. 



25 



PANORAMA 



19 3 



FRANCES ELIZABETH LEWIS 
"Fran" 



OTIS, MASS. 

W. A. A. 1. 2, 3 
Dramatic Club 2, 3 
Treasurer, W. A. A. 2 
Point Keeper W. A. A. 3 



Volley Ball 
Pageant 2 



"Fran" is rather quiet and somewhat shy. She has cer- 
tainly helped to keep the W. A. A. running. Very much in- 
terested in her studies, and also in "waiting on table", she 
has proven to be a dependable worker. 



DORIS LUCILLE MARCHANT 
"Dot" "Dorrie" 

28 GOODRICH STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

W. A. A. 1, 2 Dramatic Club 1 

Basketball 1, 2 Pageant 2 

You'll search a long time before you find a more consci- 
entious or more helpful girl than Doris. However, don't think 
that "Dot" ever lets her duties intrude upon those specially 
reserved evenings. 



LUCILLE WINTER MORRISON 
"Lu" 

LEVERETT, MASS. 



W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Dramatic Club 2 
Secretary, W. A. A. 2, 3 



Pageant 2 
Axis Staff 3 
Basketball 2 



Dainty and petite is our Lucille, always industrious and 
ready for more work. We envy her future pupils, and we 
remember with delight her charming manner and musical 
voice. 



HELEN MARIAN NEWELL 
"Billie" 

74 ASHLAND STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

W. A. A. 1 Assembly Chairman 1, 2, 3 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3 Forum 3 

Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 Ring Committee 3 

Axis Staff 1, 2, 3 Advt. Manager, Play 3 

As Chairman of Student Assemblies for three years, 
"Billie" has been held in awe by all underclassmen, and 
well deserves any commendations which we of '33 can give 
her. 

Loving gaiety and life, especially dancing, she has been 
one of the promoters of all our Man Dances. We know she 
will be a credit to S. T. C. N. A. 



26 



1933 



PANORAMA 



FANNIE ELIZABETH PERCEY 

BENNINGTON, VERMONT 



Glee Club 2, 3 

Forum 3 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 



Senior Play 3 
Class Book Staff 3 



Fannie has proven a friend to all with her helpfulness 
and cheerfulness over hard spots. Her dependability and 
energy have made her develop into fine teaching material. 
Any superintendent will be happy to have her in his school 
system. 



EDNA CAMPBELL ROCKWOOD 
"Eddie" 

126 SCOTT STREET, BENNINGTON, VERMONT 

Wittiest 



Glee Club 2, 3 
Axis Staff 1, 2 
Secretary of Finance 2, 3 



W. A. A. 1, 2 

Class Book Staff 3 

Forum 3 



"Eddie" is known to us for her happy-go-lucky disposi- 
tion which makes many friends for her. If you ever need 
an antidote for "Old Man Depression", call on "Eddie." 
Success to her! 

ELIZABETH M. RUGG 

SOUTHFIELD, MASS. 

Glee Club 2, 3 Washington in Pageant 2 

Dramatic Club 2, 3 Student Council 1 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 Council President 2, 3 

Vice-President Class 1 House Council 1 

Speaker-Delegate, Conf. 2 Basketball 3 

"For she is wise if I can judge of her 

And fair she is if that mine eyes be true, 
And true she is as she has proved herself." 

Elizabeth, for two years President of the Student Coun- 
cil, was one of our delegates to speak at the New York Con- 
ference. This trip was a great success; and, later, do you 
remember what a gallant George Washington she made? 
We shall always remember her for her graciousness and un- 
usual poise. 



MARGARET MARY SEERY 
"Peg" 

145 BRACEWELL AVENUE, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



Axis Staff 1, 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2 
Dramatic Club 3 
Student Council 2 



Forum 3 
Pageant 2 



"Peg" has a personality that will do much for her in 
the teaching field. We have witnessed her in action, — re- 
member Guest Day? Your Alma Mater is proud of you, 
"Peg". Keep up the good work, for She stands behind you. 



27 



PANORAMA 



19 33 



EVELYN SHAKAR 

47 COMMERCIAL STREET, ADAMS, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 


Class Book Staff 3 


Dramatic Club 


Senior Play 3 


W. A. A. 


Pageant 2 


Operetta 2 


Basketball 1, 2 


Axis Staff 2 


Student Council 3 


Archery 1, 2, 


Forum 3 



The vivacious little "Princess" of the Class Play had en- 
deared herself to our hearts, as she so daintily captivated the 
heart of the "Page". Hers is the lunch which has daily 
tempted us for three years with its varying contents. 

Evelyn possesses a beautiful voice and a rare business 
sense both of which she has given freely for the advance- 
ment of class and college. 



ALTHEA MAE SPRING 

"Al" 

161 WALNUT HILL STREET, ORANGE, MASS. 



Glee Club 1 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Operetta 1 
Fire Chief 3 
Axis Staff 2, 3 



Class Treasurer 3 

Class Book 3 

Class Play 3 

Forum 3 



"Al's" artistic ability has materially aided in our attain- 
ment of an especially fine class ring. Her taste in design is 
recognized and accepted as being very high in quality. It 
might be a good idea to cultivate designing as a fine art in 
your spare time, Althea. 



FLORENCE MAY SWARTZER 

59 HATHAWAY STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 Pageant 2 

Axis Staff 2 W. A. A. 1, 2 

Secretary of Class 2 Class Historian 3 

Secretary, Student Council 3 Forum 3 

Ring Committee 3 

Florence isn't a loudly loquacious person but when she 
sets about a task, rest assured it will be completed in a fin- 
ished style. She is one who will accomplish, through her 
quiet dignity, whatever she has before her. 



GINA T. TAVELLI 

35 HALL STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. 

Glee Club 1, 2 
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Class Treasurer 2 
Basketball 1, 2, 3 
Axis Staff 3 



Class Book Staff 3 

Pageant 2 

W. A. A. Conference 3 

Forum 3 

Head of Sports 



One of our best sports, athletically and in daily life, is 
Gina. This tall lady always entertains us good naturedly 
when she finds it necessary to speak or announce at Assem- 
bly. 

As Joke Editor she invariably manages to find items that 
tickle our highly critical senses of humor. Keep on with the 
good work. We are ever back of you, Gina. 



28 



193 3 



PANORAMA 



MARJORIE RUTH TIRRELL 
"Marj" 

PLAINFIELD, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 
Secretary of Class 3 
Forum 3 



Social Committee 
Student Council 



When "Marj" as secretary took the minutes of our class 
meetings, she surely had an unforgettable task. But anyone 
who knows "Marj" realizes that such minor occurences do 
not disturb the calm she always maintains. 



INA MARY TYLER 

66 BEACH STREET, ATHOL, MASS. 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Dramatic Club 1 
President Glee Club 2, 3 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 



Operetta 1 

Pageant 2 

House Council 2, 3 

Basketball 1, 2, 3 



"Full well she plays all and every part 
By turns — with a vivacious versatility." 

In three years Ina has made a name for herself both at 
the dormitory and at the school. She's the best prescrip- 
tions known for homesick Freshmen, with her stories of 
what a good time she had at such and such a "frat" dance! 
Ina has been President of Glee Club two years, which has 
kept her quite busy. Her sunny disposition and friendly 
personality will always make friends for Ina. 



OLIVE WRIGHT 

FORT PELHAM FARM, ROWE, MASS. 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3 Axis Staff 1, 2, 3 

W. A. A. 1, 2, 3 Class Book 3 

Class Treasurer 1, 2 Basketball 1, 2 

House Council 1, 3 Operetta 1 

President, Taconic Hall 2, 3 Pageant 2 

Vice-President, House Council 1, 2 

Always ready to suggest the right, tactfully getting us to 
avoid the wrong, Olive has been for three years a helpful, 
guiding hand to the class. Her interest lay chiefly with the 
mail-man or rather, with his mail, and Houghton seemed 
to be the password. Here's hoping — modern means of trans- 
portation go swiftly ahead — Alaska is to Massachusetts as — . 




29 



PANORAMA ::::::: 1933 



MURIEL LEONA EMERY 

10 FAIRMOUNT AVENUE, WAFEFIELD, MASS. 

Assistant Matron Glee Club 

W. A. A. Orchestra 

The Class of 1933 has adopted Muriel, and she is as much 
a member of our group as if she had been with us for three 
years instead of one. Her wider experience, her friendliness, 
and her pleasing personality have made her very welcome in 
her return to S. T. C. 



MARY ELIZABETH McGRATH 

88 SUMMER STREET, ADAMS, MASS. 

Glee Club Forum 

Mary is one of our special students, a new member of 
our class this year. She has obtained a position in her home 
town, and we wish her the best of luck. May you prosper, 
Mary! 



ANNA OGERT McKAY 
"Anne" 

86 MEACHAM STREET, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. 

Forum W. A. "A. 

Returning for third year study, Mrs. McKay has quietly 
worked for a year within our class ranks. She has made 
friends and has helped our group, and we have been glad to 
welcome her. 



30 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



ANGELA MILANI 

ASHLEY FALLS, MASS. 

Forum W. A. A. 

Angela has gone her quiet way through these halls with 
our class for one year now, and we wish that we might feel 
better acquainted with her. Good luck and good fortune, 
whether you stay for another year or whether you go out to 
teach! 



HELEN LEE NAUGHTON 

225 CHURCH STREET, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

Glee Club President, Forum 

Dramatic Club Conference Delegate 

Class Play W. A. A. 

"And still they gaze and still the wonder grows, 
That one small head can carry all she knows." 

Is there anything Helen isn't able to do? She can man- 
age a library, teach school, actively participate in extra 
curricular activities. We thought we knew all her accom- 
plishments, but when the cast for the Senior Play was chos- 
en, behold, she proved to be a piccolo player, as well as a 
dashing Page! 



iEx-Hrmbera 

GRACE BOYD VERONICA TETREAULT 

EVELYN COOPER MARGARET STEWART 

ELIZABETH PIPER HENRIETTA WORTHINGTON 

MARION TERRILL KATHRYN BRODERICK 



31 



a 
i— i 

w 

o 

O 

CO 




19 3 3 



PANORAMA 



Sljirft f par (filaas 



Mariam Austin 
Evelyn J. Barker 
Alice S. Bradford 
Thelma D. Cary 
Katherine E. Eichert 
Muriel Emery 
Mary Francis Field 
Mary Anne Flannery 
Sarah M. Fleming 
Evelyn Ellen Gagliardi 
Ruth Irene Gleason 
Juanita Howard Hazelton 
Elizabeth Agnes Hewitt 
Helen Elizabeth Horan 
Dorothy Jacobs 
Sophie C. Jekanoski 
Anna I. Lacey 
Frances Lewis 
Doris Lucille Marchant 
Mary R. McGrath 
Anna Ogert McKay 
Angela Milani 
Lucille Winter Morrison 
Helen Naughton 
Helen M. Newell 
Fannie Elizabeth Percey 
Edna C. Rockwood 
Elizabeth M. Rugg 
Margaret M. Seery 
Evelyn Shakar 
Althea Spring 
Florence M. Swartzer 
Gina T. Tavelli 
Marjorie R. Tirrell 
Ina M. Tyler 
Olive G. Wright 



76 Stratford Avenue 
32 Third Street 
23 Holbrook Street 
723 Church Street 
161 River Street 

10 Fairmont Avenue 

93 Glen Avenue 
State Road 

11 Duggan Street 
R. F. D. No. 2 

19 Eaton Street 
52 Columbia Street 
842 South State Street 
28 Washington Avenue 
R. F. D. Box 112A 



43 Notch Road 
88 Summer Street 



225 Church Street 
79 Ashland Street 

204 Grove Street 

100 Veazie Street 
47 Commercial Street 
161 Walnut Hill Street 
59 Hathaway Street 
35 Hall Street 

66 Black Street 



Pittsfield 

Pittsfield 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Blackinton 

Wakefield 

S. Williamstown 

North Adams 

Williamstown 

North Adams 

Clarksburg 

Wakefield 

Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Hadley 

Cummington 

Otis 

North Adams 

Adams 

Williamstown 

Ashley Falls 

Leverett 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Bennington, Vt. 

Bennington, Vt. 

Southfield 

North Adams 

Adams 

Orange 

North Adams 

Williamstown 

Plainfield 

Athol 

Rowe 



33 



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O 
| -d 

X 

o 

g 

o 

to 
H 

Q 

> 

CO 




1933 



PANORAMA 



Helen Bartley 
Elizabeth Bond 
Helen Boyle 
Mary Busti 
Helen Crofts 
Elizabeth M. Enright 
Virginia E. Fish 
Mary Ann Fleming 
Margaret E. Grosz 
Margaret A. Hart 
Linda L. Hazelton 
Margaret E. Henderson 
Elsie M. Howland 
Helen Klein 
Bessie Less 
Mary C. McDonnell 
Blanche Y. McGeoch 
Margaret McGregory 
Velma M. O'Connell 
Lucy A. Ostrowski 
Doris Perkins 
Helen E. Ranney 
Olive M. Roberson 
Dorothy M. Russell 
Josephine Ryan 
Doris E. Sanderson 
Mildred Scholz 
Genevieve Smith 
Elsie F. Snow 
Vera D. Ziemba 



196 Elm Street 
Chestnut Street 

148 Brooklyn Street 
81 Parker Street 

Adams Road 

488 West Main Street 

29 Hall Street 

19 Eaton Street 

612 Tyler Street 

West Shaft Road 

Goodrich Street 

80 Elmwood Avenue 

Church Street 

146 Burbank Street 

12 First Street 

52 Edward Avenue 

Box 5, Taylor Hill 

15 Washburn Street 

Pine 

2 Gardner Road 

45 Springside Avenue 
High Street 
108 Summer Street 
22 Arlington Street 

13 Water Street 
East Hoosac Street 



Northampton 

Rowe 

Hatfield 

Farnums 

North Adams 

Pittsfield 

Colrain 

Williamstown 

North Adams 

Williamstown 

Wakefield 

Pittsfield 

North Adams 

Stockbridge 

North Adams 

Stockbridge 

Pittsfield 

Adams 

Pittsfield 

Montague 

Middleboro 

North Amherst 

Reading 

North Hadley 

Pittsfield 

Haydenville 

Adams 

Pittsfield 

Williamstown 

Adams 



35 



w 

H 
CO 

H 
Si 

O 

> 
co 

CO 




193 



PANORAMA 



iFrraljumt (Class 



Ruth Blackinton Browne 
Eleanor Corrigan 
Elizabeth Mary Crandall 
Dorothy Phyllis Daniels 
Dorothy Lincoln Edson 
Magdalene Katherine Eichert 
Muriel E. Gingras 
Helen S. Hodgkins 
Dorothea L. Hoffmann 
Ruth E. Jacob 
Ella M. Karrey 
Dorothy Holman Lee 
Esther F. Levine 
Ruth A. Lintner 
Violet Wenonah Longstreet 
Ida Rose Maino 
Kathryn M. McGee 
Margaret Allen Miles 
Ruth Baker Pittsinger 
Marian Raedel 
Frances Alice Singleton 
Evelyn Frances Smith 
Margaret Julia Stevenson 
Mary Alice Walsh 
Francis Eleanor Walshe 
Marion Shephard Wood 



932 South Church Street 
16 Pine Street 
243 Pecks Road 
505 East Main Street 

25 Overlook Terrace 
161 River St., Blackinton 
Leonard Street 

99 High Street 
36 Crandall Street 
12 Walker Street 
64 Charles Street 
9 Middle Street 
129 New Road 
180 Ashland Street 
18 Power Court 
36 Henderson Road 
5 Pleasant Street 

7 Charles Street 

59 South Street 

8 Center Street 
110 Ashuelot Street 
104 Notch Road 

20 Gallup Street 

26 Franklin Street 
208 East Quincy Street 



North Adams 
Adams 
Pittsfield 
North Adams 
North Adams 
North Adams 
North Adams 
Lee 
Adams 
North Adams 
North Adams 
Hadley 
Pittsfield 
North Adams 
Greenfield 
Williamstown 
Marlborough 
Woburn 
Chesterfield 
North Adams 
Leeds 
Dalton 

North Adams 
North Adams 
North Adams 
North Adams 



37 



PANORAMA 



1933 




ELIZABETH RUGG, President 
MR. VENABLE, Advisor 



Charlotte McDonnell 
Alice Bradford 
Sally Fleming 
Helen Ranney 
Marion Wood 
Dorothea Hoffmann 
Marjorie Tirrell 



Anne Lacey 
Helen Crofts 
Mariam Austin 
Olive Wright 
Florence Swartzer 
Elizabeth Crandall 



38 



19 3 3 



PANORAMA 




Evelyn Barker 
Alice Bradford 



Fannie Percey 
Sally Fleming 
Anne Lacey 



flannrama Staff 

Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Gleason 

Write Up Editors 



Gina Tavelli 
Faculty Editors 

Business Managers 

Advertising Managers 

Joke Editor 

Edna Rockwood 



Althea Spring 
Olive Wright 



Evelyn Shakar 

Katherine Eichert 

Sophie Jekanoski 



39 



PANORAMA 



1933 




Ruth Gleason, '33 

Katherine Eichert, '33 
Althea Spring, '33 

Margaret Seery, '33 

Anne Lacey, '33 

Evelyn Barker, '33 

Olive Wright, '33 

Helen Newell, '33 

Gina Tavelli, '33 

Lucille Morrison, '33 

Evelyn Shakar, '33 

Elizabeth Enright, '34 

Bessie Less, '34 

Mr. Eldridge 



Axis g>iaff 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alice Bradford, '33 

Assistant Editors 

Mildred Scholz, '34 

Literary Department 



Poet's Corner 

Margaret McGregory, '34 

Art Corner 

Margaret Grosz, '34 

High Lights of History 

Virginia Fish, '34 

College Notes 

Linda Hazelton, '34 

Alumnae Notes 

Mary Ann Fleming '34 

Wit and Humor 

Margaret Hart, '34 

Exchange Department 

Margaret Henderson, '34 

Business Managers 

Dorothy Jacobs, '33 

Advertisements 

Circulating Editors 

Faculty Advisors 

40 



Magdelena Eichert, '35 

Helen Crofts, '34 
Blanche McGeoch, '34 

Eleanor Corrigan, '35 

Muriel Gingras, '35 

Margaret Stevenson, '35 

Ella May Karrey, '35 

Margaret Miles, '35 

Elizabeth Crandall, '35 

Francis Singleton, '35 

Marion Raedel, '35 

Ester Levine, '35 

Evelyn Smith, '35 

Miss Baright 



193 3 



PANORAMA 




ukam 



MISS WESTON, Coach 



Elizabeth Rugg 
Sophie Jekanoski 
Elizabeth Hewitt 
Sally Fleming 
Thelma Cary 
Alice Bradford 
Mary Field 
Edna Rockwood 
Dorothy Jacobs 



Ina Tyler 
Olive Wright 
Katherine Eichert 
Francis Lewis 
Helen Horan 
Anne Lacey 
Gina Tavelli 
Evelyn Shakar 
Lucille Morrison 



41 



> 

O 

> 
k! 




1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



OIlafiH pag 1933 



RESPLENDENT in colorful costumes of the Middle Ages, the characters of 
Miss Edna St. Vincent Millay's "The Princess and the Page" carried us 
back to the days of castles and tower rooms, brave princes and fair ladies, and 
armored soldiers and proud kings. 

This, the 35th annual Class Play, was given at College Hall on the eve- 
ning of May 26, 1933 to an interested and delighted audience. Accompanying 
the presentation, was fitting music by the String Ensemble, and by Miss Mild- 
red Scholz, '35, violinist, and Miss Ida Maino, '35, vocalist. 

The Senior Class sincerely appreciates all the assistance given us, and 
feels especially grateful to Miss Baright and Miss Dix for their direction of 
dramatics and music. 

(Eaflt of QUyarartrra 

Princess Evelyn Shakar 

Page Helen Naughton 

King Alice Bradford 

Lord High Chancellor Fanny Percey 

First Soldier Elizabeth Hewitt 

Second Soldier Sally Fleming 

Third Soldier Althea Spring 



43 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 

(ClaBB Baij Jlrngram 

Thursday, June Fifteenth, at Two O'clock 

THE CALL Class of 1933 

PROCESSIONAL MARCH Elgar 

String Ensemble 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME Mariam Austin 

SONGS— I Hear a Thrush Eberhart 

The Lilac Tree Gartlan 

Evelyn Shakar 

D'Arlequin Drigo 

String Ensemble 

ADDRESS TO UNDERCLASSMEN _ Lucille W. Morrison, '33 

RESPONSE Margaret E. Henderson, '34 

CLASS SONG __ Words and Arrangement by Helen L. Naughton 

Class of 1933 

RECESSIONAL Gruenwald 

IVY EXERCISES ON THE GREEN 

Chant Class of 1933 

Oration Florence M. Swartzer 

Planting the Ivy Mariam Austin, '33 

Response Helen E. Ranney, '34 

Poem Olive G. Wright 

North Adams for Aye ! 

RECEPTION ON THE GREEN Taconic Hall 

PROMENADE AT 8 O'CLOCK College Hall 



44 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



AbhxtBB of Hdromp 

Members of the Faculty, Parents, Classmates, and Friends: 

IN BEHALF of the Senior Class I welcome you to these, our Class Day exer- 
cises. 

For three brief years we have worked, studied, and played here at Col- 
lege, and we have done all three with one goal constantly in mind. This goal — 
you question? To become an efficient and effective teacher, a teacher who 
will be a guide and inspiration to her pupils. 

This is not an easy goal to attain. We have made many mistakes and 
have had to retrace our steps and start anew, until at last we stand at the end 
of our long road of training — but at the beginning of our real service. We are 
going to put into practice those things which we have striven to acquire. Our 
success will be the true test of how well we have done our work. 

The teaching profession is not one to be taken lightly. To teach and to 
mold the characters of children is one of the most responsible tasks in the 
world. It contains no great glory or high praise as these terms are commonly 
thought of and yet there IS a reward — a reward of "the task well done" — an 
inner satisfaction — a feeling that we as teachers have made the world a hap- 
pier and more ideal place in which to live. Our great educators and philoso- 
phers say the aim of education is to make one happy. By that "happy" they 
do not mean frivolity or trivial and surface happiness, but sincere joy which 
is the result of working, studying, and playing so that we may get the most 
out of life. 

Here at College we have been presented with ideals to live up to, or per- 
haps I should say, one great ideal — not to be content with the ordinary, not 
to feel satisfied with merely drifting, but to put our best effort and all our in- 
genuity and energy into the work at hand, whatever it may have been. How 
true is the oft-quoted statement that "one gets out of life what one puts into it!" 
If as we go to our work in the educational field, we can keep this ideal before 
us and practice it faithfully, we cannot fail to measure near the top. 

Our years at N. A. S. T. C. seem all too brief as we look back upon them. 
We feel a deep gratitude as we realize the opportunities of preparation for 
work that have been offered here. In view of them we cannot do otherwise 
than bring credit to our Alma Mater. 

To you, Parents, we owe our greatest debt. We appreciate more deeply 
than words can express the sacrifice you have made to help us prepare for our 
work. Your interest in our activities and studies, and your faithful co-opera- 
tion will not easily be forgotten. We hope, as you look upon your daughter 
today, confident, well-trained, and possessing a zest for her work which the 
spirit of this college and its faculty know so well how to create, that you feel 
repaid. 

Members of the Faculty: To you we wish to express our most sincere 
gratitude for all you have done for us. Your criticism has been kindly and 

45 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



helpful. You have given us standards and ideals toward which to strive. 
Your influence will follow us wherever we turn in our work. We feel espe- 
cially grateful for that interest which we know does not wane after we are 
no longer active members of this school, but which reaches out to us wherever 
we may be. We shall miss your good counsel which has helped to solve our 
problems, but we also feel that you have guided and shaped our characters 
and have given us intellectual and moral principles the adherence to which 
will help us to succeed. 

Members of the Freshmen and Sophomore classes: To you we bequeath 
the traditions of our Alma Mater. We have enjoyed our contacts with you 
and we feel that you have helped us to a fuller and more rounded life. We 
really hope that we have done the same for you, and that we have added to 
your experience and education in ways which will benefit you as you leave in 
turn. I need not say, "Be loyal to your Alma Mater and make Her proud of 
you," — it is not necessary. Her influence will be with you even as it will fol- 
low us from today into the future. 

Classmates: I believe that we shall look back upon our stay at N. A. S. T. 
C. as the years pass with ever deepening affection, not only for her education- 
al assistance but for the friendships formed here, and for the happy associa- 
tions that the thought of her will call to mind. I believe that all we have learn- 
ed here we shall find a necessity for using, and as we discover ourselves to be 
adequate to our problems in life, we can give our highest thanks and praise 
to our Alma Mater. 

MARIAM AUSTIN, '33 

Class President 



46 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



IN THE September of 1923, a young man, Larrimore Foster, entered Lafayette 
College in Pennsylvania. Two years after, in the summer he spent his vaca- 
tion in Arizona. One evening he rode out on horseback to enjoy a sunset. He did 
not return. As he sat on the ground watching the beauties about him, his 
horse was frightened and as Larrimore had the lariat fastened to his wrist 
he was dragged several yards and killed. This young man, while at college, 
kept a diary and excerpts from this together with some of his letters and Eng- 
lish themes have been published in a book entitled "Larry". In writing of 
those early September days of 1923, he said "Already I am sick of the color 
green. It is a dreadful excuse, Green tie, green card about six inches 
square dangling from your lapel, and a little black cap with a bright green but- 
ton, not to mention cuffless and creaseless trousers, stamp one as a poor Fresh 
all over the place. Gee, but it is really fun, after all, because everyone pities 
the underdog and we sure are that. Gosh the sophs do love to be officious." 
Did you have any such feeling when you were freshmen? We hope not. 

More and more we are realizing that one who is well-educated is one who 
can adjust himself to the various situations which we encounter, and the many 
personalities which we meet. More and more we realize the importance of so- 
cial grace. Our Big-Little Sister Organization tends to make the life between 
upper and under classmen as pleasant as it can be. Freshmen, next year you 
will have a little sister. Make her feel at home through your sincere and 
hearty welcome. Help her in all social activities and make her feel that she 
chose the right college when she chose ours. 

Soon you will be sponsoring dances. For this work co-operation is the key 
word to success. 

Sophomores, have you noticed the seniors with a brown pamphlet-like 
book? That has been the subject of table talk, and many, as they retired, 
were trying to distinguish between total enrollment and non-membership. Of 
course, this little book is nothing more or less than the Mass. register. Don't 
let the prevailing attitude have any influence upon your approach in the keep- 
ing of registers. 

We, as a class here feel that our work has been more valuable than it oth- 
erwise would have been had we not had the many experiences that we have 
been privileged to have. What is it that has made the work so enjoyable? It 
seems to me that it is the variety of talent which we find represented in these 
classes — unique musical talent — superior athletic ability — and much artistic 
ability and dramatic skill — are all exemplified. 

The future holds much for us — joy — sorrow perhaps — but there is always 
a standard to live for. 

"Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp or what's a heaven for?" 
Now is a time when we are making decisions. The lines of John Oxenham are 
appropriate here. 

47 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 193 



"To every man there openeth a way, and ways and a way 

And the high soul climbs the high way 

And the low soul gropes the low 

And in between, on the misty flats 

The rest drift to and fro 

But to every man there openeth a high way and a low. 

And every man decideth which way his soul shall go." 

L. MORRISON 



48 



19 3 3 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



foajjnnB? tn tljp S>nttora 



BIG sisters of the graduating class, the shadow of your departure has been 
looming over us for a long time. Today on the eve of our separation, our 
feelings are a mixture of joy and sorrow — joy, because you have so success- 
fully completed what you set out to accomplish; sorrow, to know that we who 
are now such a happy family are soon to be parted. Our sharing in the many 
responsibilities, joys, and sorrows has served to bring us more closely together. 

Each one of us will miss your support, your many thoughtful kindnesses, 
and your willingness and readiness to help. We shall follow as closely as pos- 
sible your advice and your example which has been a guiding light for us. In 
the name of the Freshmen and Sophomore Classes, I wish to thank you for 
all you have done for us. 

Each one of you is going on somewhere and wherever that place may 
lead you, we feel sure all honor will be yours. 

Our halls will not seem so much like home when you have left. The place 
you held in our hearts will be hard to fill. 

You were the first to welcome us to these shores two years ago. Now when 
you are bidding farewell to our Alma Mater, we, the members of the Fresh- 
men and Sophomore Classes, wish you the best of luck and farewell in the 
words of Longfellow. 

"Sail on nor fear to breast the sea! 
Our hearts, our hopes are all with thee, 
Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears, 
Our faith triumphant o'er our fears, 
Are all with thee, — are all with thee! 
Farewell ! 

MARGARET HENDERSON 



49 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



3ujj ©ration 



FOR three years we have waited for this, our class day. It marks for many 
of us the ending of our school days; for others, it is a day of hesitation be- 
fore beginning new studies at this college. For those who shall enter the pro- 
fession for which we have prepared ourselves, — or for those who shall remain 
here, this clinging vine has many lessons. 

To us, the Ivy is more than just a plant, but it is the symbol of our faith- 
fulness and loyalty not only to our Alma Mater, but to the ideals of our pro- 
fession. Seniors, to us, it flings a challenge. Live your lives from year to 
year, with forward face and unreluctant soul. 

"Do not hurry to, nor turn from the goal 
Do not mourn for the things that are past, 
But with a whole and happy heart, 
Travel on with cheer." 

Go forth seeking what we sought while here, — new friendships, high ad- 
venture and a distant goal. Seniors, hold fast the courage of that quest! 

As we plant the waxy vine today, may it whisper to these walls our mes- 
sages of faithfulness and loyalty. 

Freshmen, — Juniors! To you the Seniors say, "Uphold those traditions 
which we have tried to keep!" 

FLORENCE SWARTZER. 



50 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



Jfuy |lnm 



f^\ IVY, with your glossy leaves, 

^-^ And clinging, searching vines, 

Be unto us a symbol true 

Of service ever more sincere, 

Of courage, dauntless, ever brave 

Of striving ever up and on. 

And may our growth in mind and soul, 

Be like the tendrils of your vines. 

That stretch forever toward the light, 

To grasp far objects just ahead. 

OLIVE WRIGHT 



51 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



ffllasa i&flttg 



TOGETHER we have forged the links of friendship's golden chain. 
Together we have formed ideals which ever will remain 
Together, we have set a goal, together, we have won 
And now, together, we must set forth our faces toward the sun. 

For all our classmates, teachers, friends our highest hopes shall be 

May each in life find happiness 

For each, success we see 

To Alma Mater evermore, we pledge our loyalty 

And may she ever be our guide The Class of '33. 

HELEN LEE NAUGHTON 



52 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



(HIubb SjtBtnrg 1 



DO YOU remember that feeling of insignificance — that lost feeling — when 
upperclassmen uproariously and joyously greeted upperclassmen, and we 
stood about attempting to look as if we felt at home, — and failing miserably? 
That embarrassment that made you say, "Oh, if I were anything but a Fresh- 
man" the day Mr. Smith called the roll and first year girls stood to be 
inspected? That sensation of looking for a needle in a hay stack on the first 
day of classes? And above all, the utter horror of your first assembly pro- 
gram? The time when you said, "Well, when I'm a Senior, I'll sit in the last 
row!" The time when you didn't know Gina, Ina, or Anne? You don't re- 
member? It's so long ago? Why, so it is! — three long years! 

Freshmen, — Juniors, — Seniors — "Tis a long, long road we've travel- 
ed." Somehow Freshman years fade rapidly from our minds, yet, it is during 
that time that some of the most important and lasting experiences of our 
school took place. During that period we became an integral part of our 
school ; we learned to understand our faculty ; we entered, then, upon our 
chosen profession. Specifically, we attended the Freshman Reception; we 
gave the Hallowe'en Party; we attended man-dances. 

It was at the end of our first year that we began to assume new responsi- 
bilities that accompanied the future "upper classmen". Many of us took part 
in "The Plumber's Operetta". Then, we began to look forward to the Senior 
graduation. At that time we, of course, gave our address to the Seniors. 
(How important we felt.) 

We helped to swell the choruses in song, and acted as admirable wait- 
resses. In other words, we helped to graduate the Seniors. Then, we packed 
our bags and with only a backward look departed for our well-earned summer 
rest. 

How quickly those ten weeks went by! About the middle of August, we 
caught ourselves looking with eager anticipation toward September, when we 
became Juniors. Big Sisters were in evidence everywhere. We did our best 
to make them comfortable, but there was a feeling of smug satisfaction when 
we saw them in well-remembered situations. We could now afford to sit back 
and smile; we were Juniors. 

FLORENCE SWARTZER 



53 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



QIIaBa BtBtnnj 2 



THIS being the bicentennial year of the birth of Washington, the entire stu- 
dent body presented a pageant play which portrayed many actual scenes 
from the life of the first President. The music used consisted of selections 
which were popular during the time of Washington and the costumes also were 
typical of the dress during the Revolutionary period. These, with the dances, 
made the pageant very elaborate and picturesque. The efforts of the players 
were rewarded when an audience of five hundred witnessed the colorful and 
scenic production. 

On May twentieth, the College and Mark Hopkins Training School par- 
ticipated in the annual Field Day on Taconic Hall Lawn where the students 
exhibited various physical activities. 

Since teaching has been recognized as a profession, there has been a rais- 
ing of standards in institutions which prepare young men and women for this 
work, and as a result of the new demands, in April 1932 our Normal School be- 
came the State Teachers College at North Adams. 

With the coming of June, the Alumni were making extensive plans for 
the annual banquet which is always a unique event, when all joy and anticipa- 
tions were plunged into gloom and our school year was brought to a sad close 
indeed, for Our President Roy Leon Smith was stricken and after about a 
week's illness, passed away on June 8. As a tribute to him who was always 
so deeply interested in the welfare of every member of our institution we offer 
these lines 

One who never turned his back but marched breast for- 
ward, never doubted clouds would break 

Never dreamed, though right was worsted, wrong 
would triumph. 

Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better 

Sleep to wake. 

For the first time in the history of our school, on June 17 at a very quiet 
and simple commencement program ten girls were presented diplomas for the 
completion of three years' work. 

As usual, the first event of this year, that of the Senior Reception for the 
Freshmen was held September twenty-third at Taconic Hall. Miss Weston led 
in the playing of games until all were well acquainted, after which followed a 
program consisting of music, skits and readings and social dancing. 

Witches! Ghosts! Goblins! Did any one ever go through the tunnel 
with the same feeling as he has on the eve of Hallowe'en? Imaginations work 
harder on this occasion than any other night in the whole year. Hear the 
weird screeches that issue forth! Feel the cold hands of a welcoming ghost 
who leads you to the scene of the evening's revelry! Recall the eerie games 
played and the refreshments of cider and doughnuts served ! 

54 



19 3 3 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



This year an innovation was established on November ten, "Guest Day," 
when friends and relatives were invited to the college to see our actual pro- 
gram as it takes place in every day practice. In the afternoon the guests were 
entertained with a program consisting of musical selections and word pictures 
of school life. Although the day was stormy, approximately two hundred 
people arrived to show the interest they hold in our college. 

1933 

Now when everyone seems to be thinking of and talking about economy 
in every phase of life severe cuts in education have been threatened. Several 
members of the Legislature proposed closing two of the smallest State Teach- 
ers Colleges, namely, Hyannis and North Adams. A state wide protest was 
immediately made to maintain our school. January fourteenth, known as 
Legislator's Day, was set aside to entertain the state legislators and to give 
them an opportunity to examine the college buildings and to see the school in 
regular session. In the afternoon in the auditorium the representatives wit- 
nessed a program in which they were presented with a variety of extra-curri- 
cular activities of the school and shown the vital need of a Teachers College 
in this western part of Massachusetts. Miss Gleason spoke on "Our Extra 
Curricular Activities," Miss Bradford described "What Our Environment 
Means To Us," and Miss Cary told of "Our Social Life." We feel greatly in- 
debted to the ligeslators and friends of the instiution who worked so earnest- 
ly in our cause, 
lators and friends of the institution who worked so earnestly in our cause. 

On May twenty-six the Senior Class gave Edna St. Vincent Millay's "The 
Princess and The Page," as the thirty-fifth annual play to which our local 
paper referred as "a finished performance in which the acting of each indiv- 
idual bordered on the professional." 



55 



PANORAMA 



1933 



General Chairman 

Evelyn Barker 

Entertainment Committee 

Katherine Eichert 

Decoration Committee 

Evelyn Barker Sophie Jekanoski 

Fanny Percey Marjorie Tirrell 



lanquet Mtnu 

Tomato Soup 



Roast Turkey 

Dressing 
Hot Rolls 



Mashed Potatoes 
Salad 
Coffee 



Ice Cream, Cake 



SfaastH 

General Chairman of Toasts- 
To the Class Advisor 
To the President 
To the Faculty 
To the Underclassmen 
To the Class 
To the Class Officers 
To the School 



-Mariam Austin 

Mariam Austin 

Fanny Percey 

Gina Tavelli 

Elizabeth Rugg 

Sally Fleming 

Ruth Gleason 

Evelyn Barker 



Reading 

Solo 

Reading 



iEtttFrtatttmrnt 



Gina Tavelli 
Evelyn Shakar 
Lucille Morrison, Helen Naughton 
Class History 



56 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



(Uraftuatum 



Friday, June Sixteenth at Two O'clock 

PROCESSIONAL— March Romaine Gounod 

String Ensemble 

ALMA MATER 

SCRIPTURE READING AND PRAYER _ Rev. Pliny A. Allen 

SONGS — Selected 

Henrietta Worthington 

ADDRESS Mrs. Anna M. Power 

Member Advisory Board, State Department of Education 

RIDE OUT ON THE WINGS OF SONG . Berwald 

THE NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES Osgood-Nevin 

Glee Club 
GIFT BY THE CLASS OF 1933-. Mariam Austin 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS . Mrs. Anna M. Power 

JUNE RHAPSODY Daniels 

Chorus 



SINGING 

God bless our native land! 
Firm may she ever stand 

Through storm and night! 
When the wild tempests rave, 
Ruler of wind and wave, 
Do Thou our country save, 

By Thy great might! 

For her our prayers shall be, 
Our Father's God, to Thee, 

On Thee we wait! 
Be her walls Holiness; 
Her rulers, Righteousness; 
Her officers be Peace; 

God save the State! 

JOHN S. DWIGHT 



57 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



Slje S>tu&ntt Qlmmril 



IN THE two years that the present third year class has had responsibilities in 
the Council it has caused many changes to take place. 

One of these changes is in the name, "Big and Little Sisters" which is now, 
"Sophomore and Freshman Sister". 

An arrangement was made whereby class meetings should be held the 
first Fr'day of each month. 

Representatives have been sent to the Student Conference in New York. 
Miss Austin represented the class in 1931, Miss Rugg in 1932, and Miss Naugh- 
ton in 1933. 

The Council has arranged for Freshman class affairs to be taken charge of 
by a chairman from the Sophomore class for the first term, at the end of which 
a permanent president is chosen from the Freshman class. 

One of the most helpful suggestions wh:'ch the Council has offered is the 
$6.00 fund which covers the cost of: 

Class dues Glee Club dues. 

All college dances. Drama Club dues. 

All issues of the Axis. W. A. A. dues. 

A new club has been formed. The Forum discusses the problems of the 
college and suggests to the Council and Student Body possible solutions. 

Funds have been very much lacking in the Council this year. For that 
reason a Japanese Sale was held which now makes it possible for us to have a 
treasury. Now the secretary assumes an added duty, that of treasurer. 

To make it possible to send representatives to the conference in New York 
a very successful Bridge Party was given. 

Preparations are being made for new handbooks. 

The various committees under the supervision of the Council are carry- 
ing on their work and are trying to plan new and better ways of doing it. 

E. M. RUGG, 

President 

din? (Elub 

President Ina Tyler 

Vice-President Virginia Fish 

Secretary-Treasurer Ida Maino 

Librarian Fannie Percey 

ON GUEST DAY, November 10, the Glee Club had a part in the afternoon 
program, and it also gave the entire Christmas concert. The Glee Club 
did its share, too, in helping to save the school on Legislator's Day. On April 
12th, at the superintendents' conference, this organization furnished part of 
the entertainment, under the effective and earnest direction of Miss Dix. 

58 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



Axis 

1932-1933 

INA TYLER, President 

THROUGH the kindness of the Alumnae Association all debts incurred by 
the Axis were paid up to date and we were able to start the year 1932- 
1933 with a "clean sheet." Consequently, it has been our purpose and inten- 
tion to keep our expenses less than our assets. 

In accordance with our plan the first issue of the Axis was mimeographed 
on the machine of the college with the much appreciated co-operation of Miss 
Allyn. 

In attempting to cut down expenses for the Christmas Issue, which we 
had decided to have printed, we had the "Jokes" scattered throughout the 
magazine wherever space was available, omitted publication of the "Ex- 
change Notes", and had the covers used as ordinary pages for the printing 
of "Ads", et cetera. 

The Sophomores did most commendable and efficient work in gathering, 
writing in part, and editing of the material for Spring Issue, while the Third 
Year Group was in the Training School. 

As had been the case with each of the three previous publications in plan- 
ing for the Commencement Number, the Staff found it a most difficult task to 
get co-operation in the way of material from the student body as a whole. As 
this has been the case for several previous years it may be advisable to change 
the form of the college publication. 

I wish success for my successors, whether it be in the editing of another 
Axis or of some other type of student publication. Whatever its name, may it 
prosper and grow! 

ALICE S. BRADFORD, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Sramattr (Eluh 

President Katherine Eichert 

Vice-President Margaret Hart 

Secretary Virginia Fish 

Treasurer Helen Crofts 

THIS has been a most successful year for the Dramatic Club, with enroll- 
ment much increased over that of previous years. The meetings have 
been attended by a great many members. During the year, the club presented 
"Green Shadows" for members of the school and guests. After the play an in- 
formal reception was held. A new novelty was introduced by the organization 
this year, whereby certain meetings were held in order to listen to plays given 
over the radio. We hope that next year's club will have as successful a year as 
we have had, and that they will attain high achievements. 

KATHERINE EICHERT, 

President 

59 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



nutPttH Athletic AsHnrtatinn 



President S. Fleming, '33 

Vice-President H. Klein, '34 

Secretary L. Morrison, '33 

Treasury L. Hazelton, '34 

Head of Sports G. Tavelli, '33 

THE W. A. A. surely has enjoyed a very interesting and varied program of 
activities under Miss Weston's capable guidance. 

Archery, soccer, hiking, basketball and baseball have all been met with 
approval. The annual trips to Mt. Greylock and to other places of local inter- 
est have attracted the attention of an unusually large number. 

During the year numerous awards were made for basketball and archery. 
Several of these coveted W. A. A. awards were presented to those who faith- 
fully practiced health rules and sport practices. 

February 14th — a date which will be remembered with pleasure by most 
of our college students — the date of the W. A. A. Carnival-Banquet. The ban- 
quet, the attractive decoration, the songs, cheers, and the entertainment, all 
contributed much to our enjoyment. The impromptu songs and cheers dur- 
ing the course of the meal added to the spirit of the affair. 

This event was preceded by a basketball game for the championship of 
the Sophomore class. These Sophomores certainly can play a "peppy" game of 
basketball ! Ask any of the spectators of that game. 

The organization sent two delegates to attend the W. A. A. Conference at 
Framingham. At this meeting our own S. T. C. was voted the host for the next 
convention. 

Due to the work of the Student Council, the W. A. A. has one assembly a 
month for its meeting. This has greatly increased the attendance and also 
the interest in the organization. 

SALLY FLEMING, 

President 



60 



1933 : : : : : : : PANORAMA 



M 



ISS Pearson : "With a single stroke of the brush Joshua Reynolds could 
change a smiling face to a frowning one." 
Fran Walshe: "Puh, that's nothing. So can my father." 

Traffic cop to H. Naughton in New York : "Hey ! Don't you know that this 
is the safety zone?" 

H. Naughton: "Yes, of course, dearie! That's just why I drove in here." 

Doctor: "H'm — severe headaches, bilious attacks, pains in the neck — 
h'm, what is your age, please?" 

Miss Weston : "Twenty-four" (coyly). 
Doctor (still writing) : "And loss of memory." 

Negro taking civil service exam for position as rural mail carrier was ask- 
ed this question : "How far is it from the earth to the sun?" 

The old fellow looked frightened and exclaimed : "Ef you-all is gwinter 
put me on that route, ah'm resignin' before ah begins." 

Mrs. Longstreet (proudly) : "Now that Winnie has lost her job, she'll 
be able to practice all day on her violin." 

Lady from flat above : "We never realize how bad this depression is un- 
til it's brought home to us. 

Scotchman: "If you print any more jokes about Scotchman, I shall cease 
borrowing your paper." 

Child: "I've lost my place in the book I was reading." 
Mother: "That's all right, Junior, just look for the place where the 
clean pages begin." 

Mr. Eldridge (from platform) : "I'm pleased to see such a dense crowd 
here to-day." 

Dumb Freshman (in front row) : "Don't be too pleased. We ain't all 
dense." 

Senator — to President Roosevelt: "Why don't you take a holiday and go 
fishing?" 

President Roosevelt: "Why should I? I just sent my secretary; he an- 
nounces the catch to the press, and I can remain at home for a much needed 
rest." 

Bostonian: "Over in England you stand for office. In America we run 
for it." 

Visitor: "Yes, but we have one sort in common — those who lie for it. 

61 



PANORAMA : : : : : : : 1933 



H. Newell (in M. H. S.) : "What do we do with a noun?" 
Child: "We decline it." 

H. Newell: "And what do we do with a verb?" 
Child: "We congratulates it." 

T. Cary (after a fall in gym class) : "This liniment makes my arm smart." 
Miss Weston: "Let's try some on your head." 

G. Holmes (in training school) had handed in his homework and M. Tir- 
rill examining it carefully said, "Gordon, this looks very much like your fath- 
er's handwriting. What have you to say about it?" 

Gordon (in a weak voice after much meditation) : "Now come to think 
of it, I did use his fountain pen." 

Child from M. H. S. : "Dad, I was appointed one of the suspectors today." 
Dad: "What is a suspector?" 

Child: "One of those who goes around the room and looks at the necks 
and ears of the kids and suspects them." 

I. Tyler waits on table in the summer, you know, but has she told you 
about this one? It seems that a man ordered pork chops with fried potatoes, 
specifying that he would like the chops lean and Ina answered — "Yes, sir. 
(And as an afterthought) which way, sir?" 

Dizzy: "Hey, there. What you runnin' for?" 

Izzy: "I'm goin' to stop a fight." 

Dizzy: "Who's fightin'." 

Izzy: "Oh, just me an' another fellow." 

A. Spring was dictating the following problem to the fifth grade, "If a 
woman gathers five eggs a day, how many eggs would she gather in a week?" 
The class meditated on the weighty problem and then one bright yougster 
said, "Say, Miss Spring, do hens lay eggs on Sundays?" 

"Why do you drink so much water, Tommy?" — a mother asked her five 
year old son. 

" So you won't have so much to wash me with," replied the youngster. 

Just in case you don't know — A lame duck is a bird who has taken a poli- 
tical padlSling. 

Private : "Sarge, what kind of a guy is a patriot and orator?" 
Sarge: "He's the kind who is always ready to lay down your life for his 
country." 

He Got What Was Coming to Him 

In the navy they are telling a story about one of the officers', Commander 
Stoney, who had charge of the U. S. S. Dolphin. One day when the ship was at 
dock, a man tried to come aboard during visiting hours. He argued until it was 
necessary to call Commander Stoney. 

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"It's after visiting hours," explained the Commander. 

"But, as a citizen of these United States, I own part of this ship," insisted 
the would-be visitor. 

The Commander turned to rail, pulled off a splinter and handed it to the 
man. 

"All right!" he remarked crisply. "There's your share. Now get out." 

"Why, I'll bet you don't know the difference between a camel and a 
dromedary." 

"Hump," was the reply. 

Song Hits 

1. "Maybe It's Because I Love You Too Much . Tears on June 16th 

2. "I Can't Remember" No Homework Done 

3. "Young and Healthy" . Gym Classes 

4. "My! Oh My" _ Mr. Holmes 

5. "You've Got Me Crying Again" _ Lesson Plans 

6. "Shuffle Off To Buffalo" _ Mr. Venable 

7. "You're Getting to be a Habit With Me" _ Miss Allyn after absence slips 

8. "Stormy Weather" _ __ Student Assemblies 

9. "Let's Call It a Day" _.. _ 4 p. m. in M. H. S. 

10. "Hi-ho Lack-a-day" The Maypole Dance 

11. "I Like Mountain Music" - H. Newell up at rural 

Miss Weston (discussing diseases carried by water) : "If one doesn't get 
well after having this disease, he dies." Now ain't that somethin'? 

Question: "How may a water seal be broken?" 

Answer: "Capillary attraction, evaporation, etc." 

But the best part of this story is that on a certain third year girl's paper in 
sanitation we found this answer. 

"Nail, chisel,—" 



SAM HIRSH 
Drug Store 



51 EAGLE STREET NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

The Friendly Place to Meet Your Friends 



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BABY PICTURES